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Stanford News
New research shows man-made and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central U.S. share the same characteristics, information that will help scientists predict and mitigate damage from future earthquakes.
Stanford News
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.
Scientific American
In the U.S., seismic activity and oil and gas production (left) have risen hand in hand over the past decade. Although most of the man-made tremors are small, the frequency of the quakes—and the damage they have incurred—has rattled residents in several states. Researchers are seeking ways to quell the rumbling.
STANFORD SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY and ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
A new software tool can help reduce the risk of triggering manmade earthquakes by calculating the probability that oil and gas injection activities will trigger slip in nearby faults.
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
Induced Seismicity: Present Understanding and Future Approaches to Manage Risk
Stanford News
Stanford scientists predict that over the next few years, the rate of earthquakes induced by wastewater injection in Oklahoma will decrease significantly. But the potential for damaging earthquakes will remain high.
STANFORD SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.
STANFORD SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY and ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
The largest recorded earthquake in East Texas was triggered by the high-volume injections of wastewater from oil and gas activities deep underground.
AGI
The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) has selected SCITS co-director, Professor Mark Zoback, for the 2016 Outstanding Contribution to the Public Understanding of the Geosciences award. This honors an individual or organization for contributions leading to greater public appreciation and better understanding of the role of geosciences in society.
AAPG
AAPG recognized Injection-Induced Earthquakes, the 2013 paper by W.L. Ellsworth, Injection-Induced Earthquakes (Science, Vol. 341, 1225942) as the winner of the 2016 Best Recent Paper Award for the AAPG Petroleum Structure and Geomechanics Division. According to the organization, "The most impactful scientific publications are technically informative, timely and contextually relevant, and challenge new ways of thinking. Ellsworth’s review of injection-induced earthquakes is highly successful in each of those ways.
CBS 60 Minutes
Bill Whitaker reports on the high incidence of earthquakes in Oklahoma, where oil and gas production is injecting vast amounts of wastewater into the earth
NPR
Some parts of Oklahoma and Texas now have about the same risk of an earthquake as parts of California, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The big difference is, the quakes in Oklahoma and Texas are "induced" — they're caused by oil and gas operations that pump wastewater down into underground wells.

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