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Stanford News
A Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.
Stanford Geophysics
Professor Mark Zoback is once again offering a free online class in Reservoir Geomechanics. This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology, and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs. To date, over 9000 people – principally college students and current industry professionals – have successfully completed the course. See More.
BY STANFORD EARTH STAFF
Stanford geophysicists have developed a detailed map of the stresses that act in the Earth throughout the Permian Basin in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico, highlighting areas of the oil-rich region that could be at greater risk for future earthquakes induced by production operations.
Stanford News
SCITS researchers find that tiny tremors caused by hydraulic fracturing of natural gas near the surface could be early signs of stressful conditions deep underground that could destabilize faults and trigger larger earthquakes.
Victoria University of Wellington
The number of small-to-moderate sized earthquakes in large areas of the central and eastern U.S. began to increase dramatically in 2005. The occurrence of many of these earthquakes correlates with the increased use of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing by the oil and gas industry. In this talk, Dr. Zoback explains how and why these earthquakes occurred and the steps that can be taken to reduce their occurrence, and what this may mean for oil and gas production in New Zealand.
Stanford News
New research shows man-made and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central U.S. share the same characteristics, information that will help scientists predict and mitigate damage from future earthquakes.
Stanford News
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.
Scientific American
In the U.S., seismic activity and oil and gas production (left) have risen hand in hand over the past decade. Although most of the man-made tremors are small, the frequency of the quakes—and the damage they have incurred—has rattled residents in several states. Researchers are seeking ways to quell the rumbling.
STANFORD SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY and ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
A new software tool can help reduce the risk of triggering manmade earthquakes by calculating the probability that oil and gas injection activities will trigger slip in nearby faults.
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.
Induced Seismicity: Present Understanding and Future Approaches to Manage Risk
Stanford News
Stanford scientists predict that over the next few years, the rate of earthquakes induced by wastewater injection in Oklahoma will decrease significantly. But the potential for damaging earthquakes will remain high.
STANFORD SCHOOL OF EARTH, ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection.

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