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nastressmap
Multiscale variations of the crustal stress field throughout North America
The Earth’s crustal stress field controls active deformation and reflects the processes driving plate tectonics. Here we present the first quantitative synthesis of relative principal stress magnitudes throughout North America together with hundreds of new horizontal stress orientations, revealing coherent stress fields at various scales.
Mountain and Trees
Stanford News
Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks’ pores.
Stanford News
A geothermal energy project triggered a damaging earthquake in 2017 in South Korea. A new analysis suggests flaws in some of the most common ways of trying to minimize the risk of such quakes when harnessing Earth’s heat for energy.
A map of earthquakes of magnitude 7.0 or higher between 1900 and 2013. Bigger dots represent stronger quakes, and red dots represent shallow earthquakes, green dots mid-depth, and blue dots represent earthquakes with a depth of 300 kilometers or more.
SMITHSONIAN.COM
Predicting earthquakes might be impossible, but some experts wonder if tools that can analyze enormous amounts of data could crack the seismic code.
Credit: Lloyd Cluff Getty Images
Scientific American
Nearly two million tiny tremors could help explain the inner workings of key faults.
Stanford Earth
Scientists are training machine learning algorithms to help shed light on earthquake hazards, volcanic eruptions, groundwater flow and longstanding mysteries about what goes on beneath the Earth’s surface.
Damage in Cushing, Okla., is seen on Monday, Nov. 7, 2016, caused by Sunday night's 5.0 magnitude earthquake. Dozens of buildings sustained "substantial damage" after a 5.0 magnitude earthquake
Midland Reporter Telegram
Concerns about human-caused earthquakes could shake up water disposal in the oil patch. Seismicity and research into injection-induced earthquakes were the focus of a recent visit to Midland by researchers with Stanford University’s Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity.
Stanford Radio
Can we harness artificial intelligence in order to gain new insights into the risks posed by earthquakes? Greg Beroza, professor of geophysics, has spent his career developing and applying techniques for analyzing seismograms in order to understand how earthquakes work and to help quantify the hazards they pose. In The Future of Everything with Stanford School of Engineering’s Russ Altman, Beroza shares his insights on the future of seismology.
Stanford News
Stanford researchers have mapped local susceptibility to man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas. The new model incorporates physical properties of the Earth’s subsurface and forecasts a decline in potentially damaging shaking through 2020.
Stanford Earth
Geophysicist Gregory Beroza discusses the culprits behind destructive aftershocks and why scientists are harnessing artificial intelligence to gain new insights into earthquake risks.
Stanford News
A Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.
Stanford Geophysics
Professor Mark Zoback is once again offering a free online class in Reservoir Geomechanics. This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology, and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs. To date, over 9000 people – principally college students and current industry professionals – have successfully completed the course. See More.

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