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The Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity is an industrial affiliates program on the topic of induced and triggered earthquakes. Ten Stanford Professors in the Departments of Geophysics, Energy Resource Engineering, Earth System Science and Civil and Environmental Engineering are involved in SCITS (see People).  They and their research groups are addressing a wide variety of scientific and operational issues associated with managing the risk posed by induced and triggered earthquakes. As recognized by the recent report of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, incidents of induced and triggered earthquakes associated with energy production have become increasingly important in recent years. |See More|

 

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November 29, 2018 (All day)
Pionner Building 3617 N. Big Spring...

News

Stanford News
Stanford researchers have mapped local susceptibility to man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas. The new model incorporates physical properties of the Earth’s subsurface and forecasts a decline in potentially damaging shaking through 2020.
Stanford Earth
Geophysicist Gregory Beroza discusses the culprits behind destructive aftershocks and why scientists are harnessing artificial intelligence to gain new insights into earthquake risks.
SCITS
The Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity (SCITS) has a Postdoctoral Research Fellow position available in the field of earthquake seismology. Candidates should have an interest and relevant skills to develop an improved understanding of the causes and consequences of induced and triggered seismicity. SCITS is an interdisciplinary industrial affiliates program at Stanford involving ten professors from four departments. More information about SCITS can be found at: https://SCITS.stanford.edu.
Stanford News
A Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.