Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Skip to content Skip to navigation

Home

About Us

The Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity is an industrial affiliates program on the topic of induced and triggered earthquakes. Ten Stanford Professors in the Departments of Geophysics, Energy Resource Engineering, Earth System Science and Civil and Environmental Engineering are involved in SCITS (see People).  They and their research groups are addressing a wide variety of scientific and operational issues associated with managing the risk posed by induced and triggered earthquakes. As recognized by the recent report of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, incidents of induced and triggered earthquakes associated with energy production have become increasingly important in recent years. |See More|

 

Upcoming Events

November 8, 2018 (All day)
Tresidder Memorial Union, 459 Lagunita...

News

Stanford News
A Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes.
Stanford Geophysics
Professor Mark Zoback is once again offering a free online class in Reservoir Geomechanics. This interdisciplinary course encompasses the fields of rock mechanics, structural geology, earthquake seismology, and petroleum engineering to address a wide range of geomechanical problems that arise during the exploitation of oil and gas reservoirs. To date, over 9000 people – principally college students and current industry professionals – have successfully completed the course. See More.
BY STANFORD EARTH STAFF
Stanford geophysicists have developed a detailed map of the stresses that act in the Earth throughout the Permian Basin in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico, highlighting areas of the oil-rich region that could be at greater risk for future earthquakes induced by production operations.
Stanford News
SCITS researchers find that tiny tremors caused by hydraulic fracturing of natural gas near the surface could be early signs of stressful conditions deep underground that could destabilize faults and trigger larger earthquakes.